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Section 5: Curriculum and Instruction

Section 5 of the ASBA classification system contains policies, regulations, and exhibits on the instructional program: basic curricular subjects; special programs, instructional resources, and academic achievement.

5.2: Planning for Educational Improvement

Each school in the district, in collaboration with administrators, teachers, other school staff, parents, the community, and students, shall develop a school-level improvement plan (SLIP) to:

  • Establish goals or anticipated outcomes based on an analysis of students’ needs;
  • Identify student supports and evidence-based interventions and practices to be implemented;
  • Describe the professional learning necessary for adults to deliver the supports or interventions;
  • Describe the implementation timeline for monitoring of the interventions and practices for effectiveness;
  • Describe the timeline and procedures for evaluation of the interventions and practices for effectiveness; and
  • Evaluate and modify a parent, family, and community engagement plan.

Each SLIP shall include a literacy plan that includes a curriculum program and a professional development program that is aligned with the District’s literacy needs and is based on the science of reading.

Some of the data that shall be considered when developing the SLIP includes, but is not limited to:

  • Statewide assessment results;
  • Interim assessment results;
  • Similarly, situated school’s SLIPs; and
  • Evaluation(s), including staff, student, and community feedback, of the existing SLIP;
  • School/District common assessment.

The SLIP is to be reviewed on an ongoing basis with reports to the board on the implementation progress of the SLIP throughout the year of implementation. By May 1 of each year, the SLIP to be implemented in the upcoming school year shall be presented to the District Board of Directors for review and approval. The District will post the District’s SLIP(s) to the District’s website under State-Required Information by August 1 of each year.

The district shall develop, with appropriate staff; school board members; and community input, a school district support plan (SDSP). The SDSP, in coordination with the District’s SLIPs, shall

  • Specify the support the District will provide to the District’s schools;
  • Collaboratively establish priorities regarding goals or anticipated outcomes with the District’s schools, including feeder schools;
  • Identify resources to support the established priorities;
  • Describe the time and pace of providing support and monitoring for the established priorities;
  • Describe the measures for analyzing and evaluating that the District support was effective in improving the school performance; and
  • Establish, evaluate, and update a parent, family, and community engagement plan.

If the Districts data reflects a disproportionality in equitable access to qualified and effective teachers and administrators, the District shall develop and implement strategies to provide equitable access as part of the SDSP.

The District shall post the District’s SDSP to the District’s website under State-Required Information, including any updates to the District’s SDSP.

The District’s Board of Directors shall hold a meeting by October 15 of each year to provide a report that systematically explains the District’s policies, programs, and goals to the community. The District’s report shall detail the progress of the District and the District’s schools toward accomplishing program goals, accreditation standards, and proposals to correct any deficiencies. The report shall be made available to the public, including by posting a copy on the District’s website under State-Required Information no later than ten (10) days following the meeting. The meeting shall provide parents and other members of the community the opportunity to ask questions and make suggestions concerning the District’s program.

Legal References:

  • A.C.A. § 6-15-2914
  • DESE Rules Governing the Arkansas Educational Support and Accountability Act
  • DESE Rules Governing Parental Involvement Plans and Family and Community Engagement Standards for Accreditation 1-B.4, 3-B.1, 3-B.2, 3-B.2.1, 5-A.1

Adopted: 6/09/09
Revised: 12/12/17
Revised: 10/09/18
Last Revised: 6/26/19

5.3P Curriculum Development/Adoption/Review

The Board encourages and supports the professional staff in its efforts to provide an on-going program of curriculum development and evaluation involving teachers, administrators, parents, other patrons and students. Sequential curricula should be developed for each subject area. Curricula are to be aligned with the curriculum frameworks and used to plan instruction leading to student proficiency on the Arkansas’ Academic Standards. Curricula should be in alignment with the District’s vision, mission, goals, and educational philosophy. Student achievement is increased through an integrated curriculum that promotes continuity and a growth in skills and knowledge from grade to grade and from school to school. Therefore, the Board desires that unnecessary duplication of work among the various grades and schools be eliminated and that courses of study and their corresponding content guides be coordinated effectively. The Superintendent is authorized to set up curriculum committees for review of each curriculum area

  • to address the continued relevance, adequacy, and cost effectiveness of individual courses and instructional programs and
  • to ensure each area is aligned with the current curriculum frameworks and course content standards approved by the State Board of Education.
  • to organize instruction by units and select new instructional materials.

The District shall implement a monitoring process to ensure that the instructional content of each course offered is consistent with the content standards and curriculum frameworks approved by the State Board of Education. The Board reserves the right to approve new programs before they are added to the curriculum.

Starting with the 2020-2021 school year, the District shall not purchase curriculum for the District’s reading program that is not from the list of curricula approved by the Division of Elementary and Secondary Education.

Manual Adoption: 2/8/00

Cross References: Professional Negotiations Agreement

Legal References:

  • Standards of Accreditation 1-A. 1, 1-A.4
  • A.C.A. § 6-15-101,
  • A.C.A. § 6-15-1505(a)
  • A.C.A. § 6-15-2906
  • A.C.A. § 6-17-429

Adopted: 3/13/84
Revised: 6/9/09
Revised: 8/16/18
Last Revised: 8/13/19

5.4 School Improvement Teams

A team structure is officially incorporated into the school-level improvement plan. New school administrators shall receive a description of the teams’ purposes and how each team is constituted; In addition, each new administrator shall receive training on methods for effective teams.

All teams shall create work plans for the year, which shall include specific work products for the team to produce. To aid in maintaining the work plan, all teams shall develop an agenda and keep minutes for each meeting. The school principal shall be responsible for maintaining a file of the agendas, work products, and minutes of all teams.

Team meetings shall take place outside of the student instructional day.

Leadership Team

Each school shall have a Leadership Team that consists of members that include:

  1. The principal;
  2. The chair of each Instructional Team;
  3. The school guidance counselor;
  4. An instructional facilitator; and
  5. Other key professionals designated by the principal.

The Leadership Team shall meet for a minimum of one (1) hour at least two (2) times each month during the school year. Based on school performance data and aggregated classroom observation data, the Leadership Team shall make decisions and recommendations on curriculum, instruction, and professional development; in addition, the Leadership Team shall serve as a conduit of communication to the rest of the faculty and staff.

Instructional Teams

The teachers in each school shall belong to an Instructional Team. The instructional teams shall be organized by:

  1. Grade level;
  2. Grade level cluster; and/or
  3. Subject area.

Each Instructional Team shall appoint a chair for the school year who shall conduct the team meetings and shall be part of the school Leadership Team. Each Instructional Team shall meet for a minimum of forty-five (45) minutes at least two (2) times a month during the school year.

The purpose of the Instructional Teams is to develop and refine units of instruction and review student learning data.

Legal References:

  • DESE Rules Governing the Arkansas Educational Support and Accountability Act School-Level Improvement Plan Indicator 36
  • A.C.A. § 6-17-114
  • AG Opinion 2005-299

Manual Adopted: 2/8/00
Date Adopted: 5/12/17
Revised: 6/26/19

5.5P Textbook and Software Selection and Adoption

I. Purpose: To establish guidelines for district-wide textbook and software selection designed to provide the highest quality instructional materials reflecting alignment with the state standards as well as multiethnic, multicultural concepts; to establish the process for the selection of instructional materials utilizing personnel and patrons; to establish responsibilities of personnel and provide direction for their carrying out their tasks.

II. Personnel affected: Central office and building level instructional staff

  1. Voting Committee
    1. Membership: The Director of Elementary and Secondary Education will appoint district-level committee members to insure a voting committee reflecting racial balance. Teachers will volunteer to serve and those selected by each principal will be submitted. Principals will submit their list after consulting with departmental chairpersons and appropriate teachers. The committee will be composed of one classroom teacher from each elementary/secondary school, two principals (respective of grade level), and one patron. The Coordinator of Multicultural Education/Pathwise will also serve on the Voting Committee. This selection will be comprehensive enough to assure representation of all teaching elements affected by the adoption selection.
    2. Responsibilities of Voting Committee Members: The voting committee members will evaluate all materials. Individual members will not contact publisher representatives for sample copies nor receive them except as approved by the Division of Learning Services.
  2. Selection Process
    • Selection of the materials will be by a majority vote of the voting committee on a secret ballot.
  3. Approval Process
    • The recommendation of the textbook selection committee will be presented to the Board for adoption upon recommendation of the Superintendent.

Date issued: 8/21/84
Date reissued: 8/9/88
Last reissued: 2/1/18

5.6: Challenge To Instructional/Supplemental Materials

Instructional and supplemental materials are selected for their compatibility with the District’s educational program and their ability to help fulfill the District’s educational goals and objectives. Individuals wishing to challenge or express concerns about instructional or supplemental materials may do so by filling out a Challenge to Instructional Material form available in the school’s office.

The contesting individual may present a copy of the form to the principal and request a conference be held at a time of mutual convenience. Prior to the conference, the principal shall consult with the teacher regarding the contested material. In the conference, the principal shall explain to the contesting individual the criteria used for the selection of the material and its relevancy to the educational program as well as any other pertinent information in support of the use of the material.

Following the conclusion of the meeting, the principal shall have five (5) working days to submit a summary of the concerns expressed by the individual and the principal’s response to those concerns to the Superintendent or the Superintendent’s designee.

If the contesting individual is not satisfied with the principal’s response, the individual may, after the five (5) working day period, request a meeting with the Superintendent’s designee where the individual shall present the same Challenge to Instructional Material form previously presented to the principal. Following the meeting, the Superintendent or the Superintendent’s designee will appoint a committee of five (5) certified personnel of the District. The committee shall consist of: the Superintendent’s designee, Director of Elementary Education, the Director of Secondary Education, the Program Administrator/Coordinator of the subject area in question, and two other certified individuals without a vested interest in the challenge. The committee shall meet and discuss privately the material in question. At the conclusion of the discussion the committee will vote by secret ballot to determine whether the material shall be removed as an instructional material.

Following the conclusion of the meeting, the Superintendent’s designee shall have (5) days to write a summary of the concerns expressed by the individual and the committee’s response to those concerns. A notice of the committee’s decision and summary shall be given (by hand or certified mail) to the complainant. The Superintendent’s designee shall create a file of the committee’s response along with a copy of the contesting individual’s Challenge to Instructional Material Form.

If, after receiving the notice of the committee’s decision, the contesting individual is not satisfied with the outcome, he/she may appeal the decision to the district Board of Education by filing a written appeal to the Superintendent within five (5) working days of the committee’s decision or of written receipt of the decision. The Superintendent shall present the contesting individuals’ Challenge to the Instructional Material Form to the Board at the next regularly scheduled meeting along with the written responses to the challenge. The Board may elect, if it so chooses, to hear brief verbal presentations from the parties involved in the challenge.

The Board shall decide at that meeting or their next regularly scheduled meeting whether to retain the material, limit the availability of the material, or remove the material from the school. The Board’s primary consideration in reaching its decision shall be the appropriateness of the material for its intended educational use.


Legal Reference: 20 USC 1232(h)(c)(C)
Date Adopted: 9/12/17
Revised: 2/1/18

5.7 Selection of Library/Media Center Materials

The ultimate authority for the selection and retention of materials for the schools’ media centers rests with the Board of Education which shall serve as a final arbiter in resolving a challenge to any media center materials. Licensed media center personnel shall make the initial selections in consultation with school and district licensed staff. Materials selected shall be in accordance with the guidelines of this policy.

The purpose of the schools’ libraries/media centers is to supplement and enrich the curriculum and instruction offered by the District. Promoting the dialogue characteristic of a healthy democracy necessitates the maintenance of a broad range of materials and information representing varied points of view on current and historical issues. In the selection of the materials and resources to be available in each library/media center consideration will be given to their age appropriateness. Materials should be available to challenge the different interests, learning styles, and reading levels of the school’s students and that will help them attain the District’s educational goals.

Selection Criteria

The criteria used in the selection of media center materials shall be that the materials:

  1. Support and enhance the curricular and educational goals of the district;
  2. Are appropriate for the ages, learning styles, interests, and maturity of the schools’ students, or parents in the case of parenting literature;
  3. Contribute to the examination of issues from varying points of view and help to broaden students understanding of their rights and responsibilities in our society;
  4. Help develop critical thinking skills;
  5. Are factually and/or historically accurate, in the case of non-fiction works and/or serve a pedagogical purpose;
  6. Have literary merit as perceived by the educational community; and
  7. Are technically well produced, physically sound (to the extent appropriate), and represent a reasonably sound economic value.

Retention and Continuous Evaluation

Media center materials shall be reviewed regularly to ensure the continued appropriateness of the center’s collection to the school’s curriculum and to maintain the collection in good repair. Those materials no longer meeting the selection criteria, have not been used for a long period of time, or are too worn to be economically repaired shall be withdrawn from the collection and disposed of.

Gifts

Gifts to the media centers shall be evaluated to determine their appropriateness before they are placed in any media center. The evaluation shall use the same criteria as for all other materials considered for inclusion in the media centers. Any items determined to be unacceptable shall be returned to the donor or disposed of at the discretion of the media specialist. The media centers shall have a list of desired items to give to prospective donors to aid them in their selection of materials to donate.

Challenges:

The parent of a student affected by a media selection, or a District employee may formally challenge the appropriateness of a media center selection by following the procedure outlined in this policy. The challenged material shall remain available throughout the challenge process.

Before any formal challenge can be filed, the individual contesting (hereinafter complainant) the appropriateness of the specified item shall request a conference through the principal’s office with a licensed media center employee. The complainant shall be given a copy of this policy and the Request for Formal Reconsideration Form prior to the conference. The meeting shall take place at the earliest possible time of mutual convenience, but in no case later than five (5) working days from the date of the request unless it is by the choice of the complainant.

In the meeting, the media specialist shall explain the selection criteria and how the challenged material fits the criteria. The complainant shall explain his/her reasons for objecting to the selected material. If, at the completion of the meeting, the complainant wishes to make a formal challenge to the selected material, he/she may do so by completing the Request for Formal Reconsideration Form and submitting it to the principal’s office.

To review the contested media, the principal or district level designee shall select a committee of five (5) or seven (7) licensed personnel consisting of the principal as chair and at least one media specialist. The remaining committee members shall be personnel with curriculum knowledge appropriate for the material being contested and representative of diverse viewpoints. The task of the committee shall be to determine if the challenged material meets the criteria of selection. No material shall be withdrawn solely for the viewpoints expressed within it and shall be reviewed in its entirety and not selected portions taken out of context.

The principal shall convene a meeting after a reasonable time for the committee members to adequately review the contested material and the Request for Formal Reconsideration Form submitted by the complainant. The complainant shall be allowed to present the complaint to the committee after which time the committee shall meet privately to discuss the material. The committee shall vote by secret ballot to determine whether the contested material shall be removed from the media center’s collection. A member from the voting majority shall write a summary of the reasons for their decision. A notice of the committee’s decision and the summary shall be given (by hand or certified mail) to the complainant.

If the decision is to not remove the material, the complainant may appeal the committee’s decision to the district Board of Directors by filing a written appeal to the Superintendent within 5 working days of the committee’s decision or of written receipt of the decision. The Superintendent shall present the original complaint and the committee’s decision along with the summary of its reasons for its position plus a recommendation of the administration, if so desired, to the Board within 15 days of the committee’s decision. The Board shall review the material submitted to them by the Superintendent and make a decision within thirty (30) days of receipt of the information. The Board’s decision is final.

Legal Reference: A.C.A. § 6-25-101 et seq.
Adopted: 4/10/84
Revised: 4/14/09
Last Revised: 12/12/17
Manual Adoption: 2/8/00

5.8 Use of Copyrighted Materials

Use of Copyrighted Work in Face-to-Face Classroom

The Board of Education encourages the enrichment of the instructional program through the proper use of supplementary materials. To help ensure the appropriate use of copyrighted materials, the Superintendent, or designee, will provide district personnel with information regarding the “fair use” doctrine of the U.S. Copyright Code as detailed in the “Agreement on Guidelines for Classroom Copying in Not-for-Profit Educational Institutions with Respect to Books and Periodicals” and “Guidelines for Educational Uses of Music.”

Use of Copyrighted Works in Digital Transmissions

Definitions

Class session” means the length of time provided for students to access the materials necessary for the completion of course assignments and tests. Depending on the copyrighted work's overall importance to the course, which can vary from a single assignment to an entire course focusing on the copyrighted work, the class session will end on:

  • The date set by the teacher for an assignment to be submitted; or
  • The date on the school calendar for the end of classes.

Course packs” are premade compilations of book excerpts; newspaper, magazine, and journal articles; and instructor-authored materials.

Mediated Instructional activities” includes textbooks, workbooks, and course packs.

Transmission” is the remote accessing, whether on or off campus, by students of a copyrighted work by means of a closed circuit television, an educational television channel, or in a digital format on a password protected secure webpage.

The District recognizes that advances in technology have resulted in the need for guidelines for the use of copyrighted materials that are transmitted to students through a digital network. While the requirements to use a copyrighted work in a digital transmission have many similarities to those required to use a copyrighted work in a face-to-face classroom, Federal law places several additional requirements on the District’s teachers, IT staff, and librarians for the use of a digitally transmitted copyrighted work. The District is dedicated to providing the tools necessary for teachers, IT staff, and librarians to meet these additional Federal requirements.

The District is working toward ensuring that servers where materials are stored are secure.

The District’s Informational Technologies staff shall develop the proper protocols and train teachers on their use in order to ensure:

  1. The transmission of the copyrighted work is limited to only the students enrolled in the course:
    • Each student shall have a unique ID and password for accessing digital courses/materials; or
    • Each course shall have a unique password to access course materials; and
    • The password to access the course materials shall be changed immediately following the close of the course.
  2. To prevent students from retaining or further disseminating the copyrighted work for more than one class session:
    • The print function will be disabled;
    • A transparency shall be placed over any literary work, sheet music, or photograph;
    • Audio and video transmissions will be set to be streamed; and
    • The link to the webpage with a copyrighted work shall be deactivated at the end of the applicable class session.

Teachers who wish to provide copyrighted works to students through a digital transmission as part of a digital course as well as teachers wishing to supplement a face-to-face classroom course with a digital transmission must meet applicable copyright statutes and policy 5.11—Digital Learning Courses as well as the following requirements in order to use a copyrighted work:

  1. The use of the copyrighted work(s), whether in whole or in part, must be a part of regular classroom instruction and must be directly related and of material assistance to the course content:
  2. The extent of a copyrighted work that is used must comply with one or more of the following criteria:
    • The entirety of a nondramatic literary or musical work may be used. A non dramatic literary work includes poems and short stories. A nondramatic musical work covers all music that is not part of an opera or musical and does not cover the use of the music video format of a song.
    • Dramatic literary and musical works as well as videos may only be used in limited portions. Dramatic literary and musical works may only be used in the same amount as set forth in the requirements for a face-to-face classroom while videos, including music videos, may only have the portion used that is directly related to the subject of the class session and may not be transmitted in their entirety.
    • Still images or slides that a teacher would have used in the ordinary course of a face-to-face classroom session on a projector or a transparency may be used in a transmission.
    • Works primarily produced or marketed for use in the digital education market may not be transmitted.
    • Works the teacher had knowledge or reasonably believes to be unlawfully made or acquired may not be used.
    • Mediated Instructional activities may not be transmitted.
  3. A statement that works may be subject to copyright shall be placed in at least one of the following areas to provide notice to students of copyright status:
    • Course syllabus;
    • Home webpage for the course;
    • Webpage for the particular class session; and/or
    • webpage with the copyrighted work.

The teacher shall fulfill the following requirements:

  1. The amount converted is only the amount allowed by law; and
  2. The District has no digital copy of the copyrighted work available; or
  3. The District’s digital copy of the copyrighted work that is available has technological protections that prevent the use of the copyrighted work in the manner prescribed by law.

The District will not be responsible for any employee violations of the use of copyrighted materials.

Cross Reference: 5.11—Digital Learning Courses
Legal Reference: 17 USC § 101 to 1010 (Federal Copyright Law of 1976)
Adopted: 4/10/84
Revised: 4/14/09
Last Revised: 12/12/17

5.9 Computer Software Copyright

The District shall observe copyright laws governing computer software reproduction. Unless specifically allowed by the software purchase agreement, the Copyright Act allows the purchaser of software to:

  1. Make one copy of software for archival purposes in case the original is destroyed or damaged through mechanical failure of a computer. However, if the original is sold or given away, the archival copy must be destroyed;
  2. Make necessary adaptations to use the program; and/or
  3. Add features to the program for specific applications. These improvements may not be sold or given away without the copyright owner's permission.

The District shall abide by applicable licensing agreements before using computer software on local-area or wide-area networks.

Legal Reference: 17 USC § 117 Amended Dec. 12, 1980
Adopted: 4/10/84
Revised: 4/14/09
Last Revised: 12/12/17

5.10 Religion in the Schools

The First Amendment of the Constitution states that “Congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof…” As the Supreme Court has stated (Abington School District v, Schempp, 374 U.S. 203) the Amendment thus, “embraces two concepts—freedom to believe and freedom to act. The first is absolute but, in the nature of things, the second cannot be.” Therefore, it is the Board’s policy that the school system, as an agency of the government, shall be neutral in matters regarding religion and will not engage in any activity that either advocates or disparages religion. The District shall assume no role or responsibility for the religious training of any student.

The need for neutrality does not diminish our school system’s educational responsibility to address the historical role of religion in the development of our culture. Since we live in a diverse society, the District’s goal shall be to address the subject of religion objectively in such a way that it promotes an understanding of, and tolerance for, each other’s religious or non-religious views.

Discussions concerning religious concepts, practices, or disciplines are permissible when presented in a secular context in their relation to an inclusive study of religion or to the study of a particular region or country. The discussions shall be such that they are objective and academically informational and do not advocate nor denigrate any particular form of religious practice.

The teacher in charge of each classroom may, at the opening of school each day, conduct a brief period of silence with the participation of all students in the classroom who desire to participate.

Legal Reference: A.C.A. § 6-10-115
Adopted: 12/12/17

5.11 Digital Learning Courses Policy

Definitions

For the purposes of this policy

“Blended Learning” is education in which instruction and content are delivered through supervised instruction in a classroom and online delivery of instruction with some element of student control over time, place, path, or pace.

“Digital Learning” means a digital technology or internet-based educational delivery model that does not rely exclusively on compressed interactive video (CIV). Digital learning includes online and blended learning.

“Highly Qualified Teacher” means a teacher who holds at least a Bachelor’s Degree and has demonstrated subject area competence in each of the core academic subjects in which the teacher teaches. A highly qualified teacher that delivers digital learning courses under these rules is not required to be licensed as a teacher or administrator by the State Board of Education. This definition, however, does not override the fact that Federal laws or regulations may require teachers in certain subject areas to hold a teaching license (e.g., special education teachers who teach core academic subjects).

"Instructional Materials" means:

  1. Traditional books, textbooks, and trade books in printed and bound form;
  2. Activity-oriented programs that may include:
    1. Manipulatives;
    2. Hand-held calculators;
    3. Other hands-on materials; and
  3. Technology-based materials that require the use of electronic equipment in order to be used in the learning process.

“Online Learning” is education in which instruction and content are delivered primarily over the Internet. The term does not include print-based correspondence education, broadcast television or radio, videocassettes, compact disks and stand-alone educational software programs that do not have a significant Internet-based instructional component.

Digital Course Offerings

PULASKI COUNTY SPECIAL SCHOOL DISTRICT shall offer one or more digital learning course(s) through one or more District approved provider(s) as either a primary or supplementary method of instruction. The courses may be in a blended learning, online-based, or other technology-based format and shall be tailored to meet the needs of each student.

All digitally offered courses shall meet or exceed the State Board of Education's curriculum standards and requirements and be capable of being assessed and measured through standardized or local assessments. Additionally, the PULASKI COUNTY SPECIAL SCHOOL DISTRICT shall ensure there is sufficient infrastructure to handle and facilitate a quality digital learning environment.

As an approved digital learning provider, the PULASKI COUNTY SPECIAL SCHOOL DISTRICT shall annually determine which created digital learning courses the district will provide to our students. The PULASKI COUNTY SPECIAL SCHOOL DISTRICT may also choose to provide digital learning courses by contracting with outside providers of such courses, who have been pre-approved by the Arkansas Department of Education (ADE). The School Board shall determine the provider method or combination of methods for the District. The Superintendent shall ensure that all digital learning courses provided to District students, regardless of the source of the course, have been approved by ADE.

District created digital courses and any digital courses the district purchases from outside providers shall adhere to the guidelines for the use of digitally transmitted copyrighted materials set forth in Policy 5.8‑USE OF COPYRIGHTED MATERIALS as well as applicable statutory requirements.

The PULASKI COUNTY SPECIAL SCHOOL DISTRICT shall require all outside providers to incorporate Policy 5.8 as a condition of the service contract. Failure of the outside provider to abide by Policy 5.8 shall constitute a breach of contract and the outside provider shall be responsible for any costs resulting from such breach.

Students must apply to take digital course(s) at the beginning of FALL SEMESTER and beginning of SPRING SEMESTER. A student’s parent/guardian must sign the application.

Students withdrawing after the first day of the second nine weeks, of a semester, of class will receive Withdrew Passing (WP) or Withdrew Failing (WF).

Students withdrawing from a course before the end of a semester will not be eligible to enroll in the same course during the school day until the next semester.

Students may take TWO digital learning courses per semester. Each student will be required to complete 60 clock hours in order to be eligible for semester credit. Each student will be required to complete 120 clock hours in order to be eligible for year-long course.

All coursework and semester exams must be completed by the designated date or set by the Cyber Academy Coordinator. All grades (passing or failing) will be posted to the student's transcript. Incomplete coursework will be recorded on the high school transcript as “F” for grades 9-12.

PULASKI COUNTY SPECIAL SCHOOL DISTRICT is responsible for providing all instructional materials for each student who enrolls in a District approved digital learning course.

Regardless of any other provisions of this policy, the PULASKI SPECIAL SCHOOL DISTRICT may restrict a student's access to digital courses when the student's school principal determines the student’s participation in such a course would not be academically appropriate based on the student's past performance in digital courses. Furthermore, the student's school principal may revoke a student's eligibility to continue taking a digital learning course if the student's performance during the semester indicates the student is not succeeding in the course.

*Clock hour requirements under this policy will not apply to exceptions provided under School of Innovation waivers for students enrolled in personalized learning courses beginning with 2018-2019 school year.


Cross References:
4.45—SMART CORE CURRICULUM AND GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR THE CLASS OF 2018 AND THEREAFTER
4.45.1—SMART CORE CURRICULUM AND GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR THE CLASSES OF 2015, 2016, AND 2017
5.8—USE OF COPYRIGHTED MATERIALS

Legal References:
A.C.A. § 6-16-1401 et seq.
ARKANSAS DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION RULES GOVERNING
THE DIGITAL LEARNING ACT OF 2013

Date Adopted: 8/8/17
Last Revised: 

5.11 P1 Credit Recovery Through Integrated Learning Systems

Purpose

The computerized-instruction delivery credit recovery program is provided as a way for high school students to recover credit(s) lost due to failure. The following regulations provide guidelines for the administration of the Credit Recovery Program through the use of Integrated Learning Systems.

Eligibility Criteria

In order to be eligible to recover credit by a computerized instruction delivery program, a student must meet the following criteria:

  1. Be enrolled in grades 9-12
  2. Have been previously enrolled, according to a review of school records, in at least 60 scholastic hours per semester of core course to be recovered.
  3. Be recommended for the Credit Recovery Program by a counselor and the principal.
  4. Have parental permission to re-take the course through a computer delivered instruction program.

Available Courses

  • English I, II, III, IV
  • Algebra I
  • Geometry
  • Algebra II
  • Algebra III
  • Bridge to Algebra II

Advanced Topics in Mathematics

  • Pre-Calculus
  • Physical Science
  • Environmental Science
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Civics
  • Economics
  • United States History – American History
  • World History

The following courses will be available starting 2018-2019:

  • Earth Science
  • Chemistry I
  • Chemistry II

General Procedures

The following procedures will apply for credits recovered by computerized instruction:

Students will work independently in the integrated systems and progress at his/her own pace. Each student will be required to complete 60 clock hours in order to be eligible for semester credit. Each student will be required to complete 120 clock hours in order to be eligible for year-long credit.

The Credit Recovery Teachers will monitor students and students will regularly receive face to face assistance from a certified teacher in enrolled course as needed. Teachers will also provide daily office hours.

  1. Students must score a minimum of 60% on the post-test of each module before proceeding to the next module.
  2. A student will attain a passing grade of at least 60% in order to receive credit.
  3. All coursework and semester exams must be completed by the designated date or date set by the Cyber Academy Coordinator.
  4. The total number of credits earned in the integrated learning systems cannot exceed 2 credits per semester.

Awarding and Recording of Credit

The award of credit is subject to District approval. Credit obtained through credit by recovery will include “CR” designation on the high school transcript for grades 9-12, upon completion of the course(s).

Use of Credit

  1. Credits earned through credit recovery will be used to replace failed grades in required courses only.
  2. Under no circumstances will students be allowed to enroll in credit recovery to improve GPA by retaking a course that was previously passed.
  3. All grades (passing or failing) will be posted to the student's transcript.
  4. Incomplete coursework will be recorded on the high school transcript as “F” for grades 9-12."

Date Adopted: 8/8/17
Last Revised: 

5.11 P2 Initial Credit Through Integrated Learning Systems

Purpose

The computerized-instruction delivery initial credit program is provided as a way for high school students to receive advanced credit(s) in an effort to graduate early. Initial Credit will not be offered during the summer. The following regulations provide guidelines for the administration of the Initial Credit Program through the use of Integrated Learning Systems.

Eligibility Criteria

In order to be eligible to receive advanced credit by a computerized instruction delivery program, a student must meet the following criteria:

  1. Be enrolled in grades 9-12
  2. According to a review of school records, have never been previously enrolled in the course to be taken.
  3. Be recommended for the Initial Credit Program by a counselor and the principal.
  4. Have parental permission to take the course through a computer delivered instruction program.

Available Courses

  • English I, II, IV
  • Pre-Calculus
  • Environmental Science
  • Economics
  • Psychology
  • World History
  • U. S. History – American History

General Procedures

The following procedures will apply for initial credits by computerized instruction:

  1. Students will work independently in the integrated systems and progress at his/her own pace. Each student will be required to complete 60 clock hours in order to be eligible for semester credit. Each student will be required to complete 120 clock hours in order to be eligible for year-long credit.
  2. The Initial Credit Teachers will monitor students and students will regularly receive face to face assistance from a certified teacher in enrolled course as needed. Teachers will also provide daily office hours.
  3. Students must score a minimum of 60% on the post-test of each module before proceeding to the next module.
  4. A student will attain a passing grade of at least 60% in order to receive credit.
  5. All coursework and semester exams must be completed by the designated date or date set by the Cyber Academy Coordinator.
  6. The total number of credits earned in the integrated learning systems cannot exceed 2 credits per semester.

Awarding and Recording of Credit

The award of credit is subject to District approval. Credit obtained for advanced credit will be recorded on the high school transcript upon completion of the course(s) or date set by Cyber Credit Coordinator.

Use of Credit

Credits earned through advanced credit recovery will be used for initial credit in required courses only.

  1. All grades (passing or failing) will be posted to the student's transcript.
  2. Incomplete coursework will be recorded on the high school transcript as “F” for grades 9-12."

Date Adopted: 8/8/17
Last Revised: 

5.14P Homework

I. Purpose: To provide a guide to be used in the assignment of homework

II. Personnel affected: Building level administrators and classroom teachers

The term homework refers to an assignment to be prepared outside of class or an assignment which requires further individual work in the study hall or the home. The Board recognizes homework as an important part of the educational process and directs that homework assignments meet, at a minimum, the following objectives: improvement of learning processes; aid in mastery of skills; and the creation and stimulation of interest on the part of the students.

General Guidelines

  1. Homework will be used as a learning activity increasing in complexity with the maturity of the student. With increased maturity, learning should become a more independent activity. Meaningful assignments will be used to encourage students to investigate for themselves and to work independently as well as with others. As the student advances through school, it is reasonable to expect that the amount of homework may be increased, but care should be exercised in terms of the amount given and the time required for each assignment.
  2. Instructions for homework assignments will be clear and specific so that the student may complete the work. All homework will involve some type of follow-up and evaluation; the work will be checked for errors and corrected to provide prompt feedback and reinforcement.

Limitations

  1. Homework will not require use of materials or equipment not readily available in most homes, school libraries or public libraries and should require the use of those materials and equipment only after the student has had instruction in their use.
  2. Homework will not be used as a form of punishment under any circumstances.

Adopted: 7/9/85
Last Revised: 8/16/18
Date issued: 7/9/85
Issuing office: Division of Learning Services

5.15P1 Grading 

I. Purpose: To set forth guidelines to be used in computing and reporting grades to parents for each grading term.

II. Personnel affected: Classroom teachers

Parents or guardians, persons having lawful control of a student, or persons standing in loco parentis shall be kept informed concerning the progress of their student. Parent-teacher conferences are encouraged and may be requested by parents, guardians, persons having lawful control of a student, or persons standing in loco parentis, or teachers. If the progress of a student is unsatisfactory in a subject, the teacher shall attempt to schedule a parent-teacher conference. In the conference, the teacher shall explain the reasons for difficulties and shall develop, cooperatively with the parents, a plan for remediation, which may enhance the probability of the student succeeding. The school shall also send timely progress reports and issue grades for each nine – (9) week grading period to keep parents/guardians informed of their student’s progress.

The Board directs that grades be used to measure and report academic progress for grades K-12. All elementary schools will use report cards appropriate to the level being reported. Secondary grades will be reported by computer print-out. Grades assigned to students for performance in a course shall reflect only the extent to which a student has achieved the expressed academic objectives of the course. Grades that are aligned with other educational objectives such as the student learning expectations contained in the curriculum frameworks may also be given as prescribed by Standard VII 12.02 of the “Rules Governing Standards for Accreditation of Arkansas Public Schools and School Districts” (2007). The Superintendent is directed to provide guidelines to be used by teachers in reporting grades. These guidelines will include values for regular course-work as well as for advanced placement courses.

The grades of a child in foster care shall not be lowered due to an absence from school due to:

  1. 1. A change in the child’s school enrollment;
  2. 2. The child’s attendance at a dependency-neglect court proceeding; or
  3. 3. The child’s attendance at court-ordered counseling or treatment.

The grading scale for all schools in the district shall be as follows:

A =100 – 90
B = 89 – 80
C = 79 – 70
D = 69-60
F = 59 and below

For the purpose of determining grade point averages, the numeric value of each letter grade shall be:

A = 4 points
B = 3 points
C = 2 points
D = 1 point
F = 0 points

The grade point values for Advanced Placement (AP), approved course for weighted credit, International Baccalaureate (IB), and approved honor courses shall be one (1) point greater than for regular courses with the exception that an F shall still be worth zero (0) points.

The final grades of students who transfer in for part of a semester will be determined by blending the grades earned in the district with those earned outside the district. Each final grade will be the sum of the percentage of days in the grading period transferred from outside the district times the transferred grade from outside the district plus the percentage of days in the grading period while in the district times the grade earned in the district.

For example: The grading period had forty (40) days. A student transferred in with a grade of eighty-three percent (83%) earned in ten (10) days at the previous school. The student had a grade of seventy-five percent (75%) in our district’s school earned in the remaining thirty (30) days of the grading period. Ten (10) days is twenty-five percent (25%) of forty (40) days while thirty (30) days is seventy-five percent (75%) of forty (40) days. Thus the final grade would be .25 (83) + .75 (73) = 75.5% (0.25 X 83) + (0.75 X 75) = 77%.

Elementary Education

Pulaski County Special School District recognizes that the reporting system at the elementary level did not coincide with the Arkansas Academic Standards that are now mandated to be used in Arkansas public schools. The District began work on a new reporting system for Kindergarten through fifth grade. The new reporting system will be standards-based. A rubric will be used to report student progress and the level of mastery that each student has obtained. Specific standards at each level will be marked for each student once every 9-week grading period. Standards-Based Report cards will be phased in and implemented at grades K - 5 by 2022 - 2023. Letter grades will no longer be used at the elementary level. after the 2021-2022 school year. It is the intent of the District that the new reporting system will be more comprehensive and provide students and parents with more defined information on the academic progress of each student at the grade level for which he/she is assigned.

Secondary Education

  1. The responsibility for arriving at term grades rests with the individual teacher, but the procedure for arriving at the grade will be fully explained to students and parents and conform to the following percentage scale.
  2. For purposes of conversion of grade points into letter grades, quality points will be rounded to the nearest whole number.

Middle School Teachers

  1. To pass a course a student must have the arithmetic mean using the following formula that results in a 60% or above in order to pass a semester/class. Quarter (9-weeks) Grade (1/2) + Quarter (9-weeks) Grade (1/2)/2 = Final/Semester Percentage EXAMPLE: 84 third nine weeks + 91 fourth nine weeks would result in: 84 + 91 equals 175 divided by 2 equals 88 for final grade. Semester grades are computed in the following manner: first nine weeks – 50% (1/2) second nine weeks – 50% (1/2).
  2. In regular courses student grade points are based on the numerical value of grades as follows:
  3. A = 4.0 B = 3.0 C = 2.0 D = 1.0 F = 0

High School Teachers

  1. To pass a course a student must have the arithmetic mean using the following formula that results in a 60% or above in order to pass a semester/class. Quarter (9-weeks) Grade (2/5) + Quarter (9-weeks) Grade (2/5) + Semester Test (1/5)/5 = Final/Semester Percentage. EXAMPLE: 84 third nine weeks + 91 fourth nine weeks and a test score of 88 would result in: 84 + 84 + 91 + 91 + 88 equals 438 divided by 5 equals 88 for the final grade. Semester grades are computed in the following manner: first nine weeks – 40% (2/5), second nine weeks – 40% (2/5), and semester test – 20% (1/5).
  2. In regular courses student grade points are based on the numerical value of grades as follows:
  3. A = 4.0 B = 3.0 C = 2.0 D = 1.0 F = 0

Students in grades 9-12 shall qualify to be exempt from taking the semester test in a class when they have: (a) maintained at least a “B” average for the semester; (b) 4 or less unexcused absences; and (c) not been suspended from school. Semester grades will be determined by an average of the two Quarters (9-weeks).

Manual Adoption: 2/8/00

Legal References:

  • A.C.A. § 6-15-902
  • A.C.A. § 9-28-113(f)
  • State Board of Education: Standards for Accreditation 5-A.1
  • Division of Elementary and Secondary Education Rules Governing Uniform Grading Scales for Public Secondary Schools

Date issued: 9/21/82
Revised: 6/11/85
Revised: 8/12/86
Revised: 10/12/93
Revised: 11/8/05
Revised: 11/19/07
Revised: 3/11/08
Revised: 4/20/10
Revised: 4/19/11
Revised: 5/10/11
Revised: 12/01/11
Revised: 8/16/18
Last Revised: 6/26/19

5.17P1 Honor Roll and Honor Graduates

Students in grades K-6 who maintain a 3.0 grade point average (GPA) for the grading period will be recognized as honor roll students for that grading period. Semester grades will determine the honor roll at the end of each semester.

Students in grades 7-12 who maintain a minimum 3.0 grade point average GPA for the grading period will be recognized as honor roll students for that grading period. Semester grades will determine the honor roll at the end of each semester.

HONOR GRADUATES

Students who have successfully completed the minimum core of courses recommended for preparation for college as defined by the State Board of Higher Education and the State Board of Education and have a cumulative GPA of 3.5 on a weighted scale will be designated as honor students.2 The GPA shall be derived from courses taken in public schools or ADE accredited schools or programs in grades nine (9) through twelve (12).

For purposes of designation of student honors (valedictorian, etc.) and for college admission information, students will be ranked at the end of the first semester of the graduating year. Beginning with the graduating class of 2010 - 2011, class rank for the designation of student honors (valedictorian, etc) will be determined at the end of the eighth semester for graduating seniors. Students will be ranked at the end of the first semester of the graduating year for college admission and scholarship purposes. Class rank is to be determined by assigning the highest average a rank of number one (1); the second highest, the rank of number two (2); etc. In cases where more than one student has the same numeral average, all students with that average will be given the same rank. The next highest average will assume the next rank position which will indicate the number of students having a higher rank. The numerical rank will be extended 3 digits. Valedictorian: The student with the highest class rank will be valedictorian. In instances when more than one student holds the numerical one rank, all students holding the rank will be declared co-valedictorians. Salutatorian: The student with the second highest class rank will be declared salutatorian. In instances when more than one student holds the numerical two rank, all students holding the rank will be declared co-salutatorians. Honor Graduate: In order to qualify as an honor graduate, a student must have a minimum 3.5 grade point average and be enrolled in core courses required for graduation by the final semester of the year in which he will graduate. A student enrolled in a course which cannot be completed by the end of the fourth nine weeks is not eligible to be an honor graduate.

In computing class rank of students, the following system will be used: Regular Classes: Each grade will be given the indicated value, A = 4, B = 3, C = 2, D = 1, F = 0. U Advanced Placement Classes U: Each advanced placement course will be given the indicated value, A = 5, B = 4, C = 3, D = 2, F = 0.

Adopted: 5/9/89

Revised:

  • 3/14/95
  • 1/09/07

Last Revised: 12/12/17

Legal References:

  • A.C.A. § 6-18-101 (a) (2)
  • A.C.A. § 6-18-101 (b)
  • A.C.A. § 6-18-101(e)
  • A.C.A. § 6-61-217(a)

Cross References: Handbook for Student Conduct and Discipline (Secondary)
Manual Adoption: 2/8/00

5.17P2 Graduation Exercises
  1. Purpose: To establish guidelines for determining student eligibility to participate in graduation exercises.
  2. Personnel affected: Senior high school principals and counselors responsible for graduating students.

The Board believes that public schools reflect society’s intent to promote not only development of the individual but the community good as well. It further believes that the community should share in the recognition of those who have completed the educational programs of the schools. The Board, therefore, directs that publicly celebrated graduation exercises be held. Appropriate graduation programs will be planned by senior high schools and conducted within the time frame established through the current school year calendar. At these programs awarding of diplomas will be by a Board member(s), the Superintendent, or the Principal. All students having met regulations established by the Superintendent may participate in the graduation ceremonies.

Determination of Eligibility

  1. Any student who has completed seven (7) semesters of schooling in grades 9-12 and who has earned a minimum of twenty and one-half (20 ½) units of credit will be considered eligible to participate in graduation exercises after completion of the eighth semester.
  2. Students who complete the eighth semester and do not meet the twenty and one-half (20 ½) unit requirement at the end of the seventh semester will be allowed to participate if credit requirements are completed at least one week prior to graduation. Proof of completion in all course work must be verified and documented by school personnel.
  3. Students who plan to graduate early (less than eight (8) semesters), must meet the same provisions as stated in number two (2) above.
  4. Beginning with the graduating class of 2010 – 2011, students must complete all graduation requirements that are in effect at the time of graduation to be eligible to participate (walk) and receive their diploma at graduation ceremonies.

Adopted: 6/8/82

Revised:

  • 11/9/82
  • 6/12/90
  • 7/17/97
  • 1/09/07
  • 9/11/07

Last Revised: 12/12/17
Manual Adoption: 2/8/00
Issuing office: Superintendent

5.20 District Website

The Pulaski County Special School District shall maintain a web page to provide information about its schools, students, and activities to the community. This policy is adopted to promote continuity between the different pages on the district website by establishing guidelines for their construction and operation.

The Pulaski County Special School District website shall be used for educational purposes only. It shall not create either a public or a limited public forum. Any link from any page on the District’s site may only be to another educational site. The website shall not retain identifying information about visitors to its website nor shall any such information be given to “third parties.” Any data collected shall be used solely for the purpose of monitoring site activity to help the district improve the usefulness of the site to its visitors.

Each school’s web page shall be under the supervision of the school’s Web Master and the District’s website shall be under the supervision of the District’s Web Master. They shall have the responsibility for ensuring that web pages meet appropriate levels of academic standards and are in compliance with these guidelines and any additional administrative regulations. To this end, the District and School Web Masters shall have the authority to review and edit any proposed changes to web pages to ensure their compliance with this policy. All such editing shall be viewpoint neutral.

District and school web pages shall also conform to the following guidelines:

  1. All pages on the District’s website may contain links only to educational sources except on a single page designated for such.
  2. The District’s home page shall contain links to existing individual school’s web pages and the school home pages shall link back to the District’s home page. The District’s home page may also include links to educational extracurricular organizations’ web pages which shall also link back to the District’s home page.
  3. Photos along with the student’s name shall only be posted on web pages after receiving written permission from the student’s parents or the student if the student is over the age of eighteen (18).
  4. No web page on the District website may contain public message boards or chat rooms.
  5. All web pages on the District website shall be constructed to download in a reasonable length of time.
  6. The District’s home page shall contain a link to an acceptable use which must be placed in a clear and prominent place and manner.
  7. With the exception of students who may retain the copyright of material they have created that is displayed on a District web page, all materials displayed on the District web site are owned by Pulaski County Special School District.
  8. Included on the District’s web site shall be:
    1. Local and state revenue sources;
    2. Administrator and teacher salary and benefit expenditure data;
    3. District balances, including legal balances and building fund balances;
    4. Minutes of regular and special meetings of the school board;
    5. The district’s budget for the ensuing year;
    6. A financial breakdown of monthly expenditures of the district;
    7. The salary schedule for all employees including extended contract and supplementary pay amounts;
    8. Current contract information (not including social security numbers, telephone numbers, personal addresses or signatures) for all district employees;
    9. The district’s annual budget;
    10. The annual statistical report of the district;
    11. The district’s personnel policies;
    12. The annual School Performance Report;
    13. School-Level Improvement Plan; and
    14. The School District Support Plan.;
    15. Student discipline policies;
    16. Student services plan;
    17. The District financial policies;
    18. Student handbooks;
    19. The Annual Report to the Public; and
    20. The parent, family, and community engagement plan;
    21. The Immunization waiver report from Policy 4.57 Immunizations

The information and data required for items A through K in 9 above shall be the actual data for the previous two (2) school-years and the projected data for the current school-year.

Before July 15 of each year, the District shall post on its website the following information:

  • The dyslexia intervention programs used during the previous school year that were specifically responsive to assisting students with dyslexia;
  • The number of students during the previous school year who received dyslexia intervention; and
  • The total number of students identified with dyslexia during the previous school year.

The District and District Webmaster are responsible for ensuring all District webpages meet required standards to be accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Cross Reference:

  • 5.2 Planning for Educational Improvement
  • 4.57 Immunizations

Legal References:

  • A.C.A. § 6-11-129
  • A.C.A. § 6-15-1402
  • A.C.A. § 6-15-2006
  • A.C.A. § 6-15-2101
  • A.C.A. § 6-15-2914
  • A.C.A. § 6-41-606
  • A.C.A. §6-41-611
  • DESE Rules Governing How to Meet the Needs of Children With Dyslexia
  • DESE Rules Governing the Arkansas Educational Support and Accountability Act
  • Standards For Accreditation 12.02.1, 1-B.2, 2-B.1, 2-H.2, 3-A.1, 3-A.2, 3-A.9, 3-B.1, 3.B.2.1, 5-A.1
  • 20 U.S.C. § 1232 g
  • 15 U.S.C. § 6501 (COPPA)

Adopted: 12/12/17
Revised: 2/1/18
Revised: 10/09/18
Last Revised: 6/26/19

5.20.1 Web Site Privacy Policy

The Pulaski County Special School District operates and maintains a web site for the purpose of informing the citizens of the district about its activities. The web site does not collect or retain personally identifying information about visitors to its web site nor is any such information given to “third parties.” Any data collected is used solely for the purpose of monitoring site activity to help the district improve the usefulness of the site to its visitors.

The site serves no commercial purpose and does not collect any information from individuals for such purpose.

Photographs of students, when associated with the student’s name, shall not be displayed on any page of the district’s web site without the prior written consent of the parent (or the student if 18 or older).

The site provides for email communication between the District and individuals for the purpose of exchanging information regarding the District and its activities or between teachers and their students. The site may also provide for password protected communication between the District and its staff.

Legal Reference: 15 U.S.C. § 6501 (COPPA)
Adopted: 12/12/17

5.21 Advanced Placement Courses

Students in grades 7-12 who take advanced placement (AP) courses or concurrent credit college courses approved for weighted credit by the Division of Elementary and Secondary Education shall be graded according to the following schedule.

A =100 – 90
B = 89 – 80
C = 79 – 70
D = 69-60
F = 59 and below

For the purpose of determining grade point averages, the numeric value of each letter grade shall be

A = 5 points
B = 4 points
C = 3 points
D = 2 point
F = 0 points

For a student to be eligible to receive weighted credit for an AP course:

  • The course must be taught by an Arkansas licensed teacher who has received the appropriate training required by Arkansas statute and DESE Rule or, for an AP teacher, is in the process of completing an Additional Training Plan; and
  • The student takes the applicable AP examination after completing the entire course. Credit shall be given for each grading period during the course of the year, but shall be retroactively removed from a student’s grade for any course in which the student fails to take the applicable exam. Students who do not take the applicable exam shall receive the same numeric value for the grade he/she receives in the course as if it were a non-AP course.

Students who transfer into the district will be given weighted credit for the AP courses approved by the Arkansas Department of Education, or concurrent college courses taken for weighted credit at his/her previous school(s) according to the preceding scale.

AP exams and the student’s score on the exam does not affect the student’s grade for the course, students can reasonably be expected to take the test. By standardizing the timing of awarding weighted credit across Arkansas, all students will be on a level playing field regarding their GPA for college applications.

Legal References:

  • DESE Rules Governing Uniform Grading Scales for
  • Public Secondary Schools
  • DESE Rules for Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Diploma Incentive Program
  • A.C.A. § 6-15-902
  • A.C.A. § 6-16-806

Adopted: 12/12/17
Revised: 6/26/19

5.22P Concurrent Credit

A ninth (9th) through twelfth (12th) grade student who successfully completes a college course from an institution approved by the Division of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) will be given credit toward high school grades and graduation at the rate one (1) high school credit for each three (3) semester hours of college credit. To receive replacement credit for graduation, the school’s principal must approve the college course prior to enrollment. If prior approval is not sought or granted, the concurrent college course will be credited as a career focus elective and will be applied toward graduation requirements as a career focus elective. As permitted by the DESE Rules Governing Concurrent College and High School Credit, a student who takes a three (3) semester hour remedial/developmental education course, shall receive a ½ credit for a high school career focus elective. The remedial/developmental education course cannot be used to meet the core subject area/unit requirements in English and mathematics.

Participation in the concurrent high school and college credit program must be documented by a written agreement between:

  • The student’s parent(s) or legal guardian(s) if the student is under the age of eighteen (18);
  • The District; and
  • The publicly supported community college, technical college, four-year college or university, or private institution the student attends to take the concurrent credit course.

Students are responsible for having the transcript for the concurrent credit course(s) they’ve taken sent to their school in order to receive credit for the course(s). Credit for concurrent credit courses will not be given until a transcript is received. Students may not receive credit for the course(s) they took or the credit may be delayed if the transcripts are not received at all or in a timely manner time, or at all; this may jeopardize students’ eligibility for extracurricular activities, graduation, or honor distinction.

Students will retain credit earned through the concurrent credit program that was applied toward a course required for high school graduation from a previously attended, accredited, public school.

A student eligible to receive free or reduced price meals shall not be responsible for any of the costs for the student’s first six (6) concurrent credit hours so long as the concurrent credit courses are taught on the District grounds and by a teacher employed by the District. Any and all costs of concurrent credit courses beyond the six (6) hours permitted, that are not taught on the District’s campus, or are not taught by a teacher employed by the District are the responsibility of the student. Students who are not eligible to receive free or reduced price meals are responsible for any and all costs associated with concurrent credit courses.

Cross Reference:

  • 4.59 Academic Course Attendance by Private
  • School and Home Schooled Students

Legal References:

  • A.C.A. § 6-15-902(c)(2)
  • A.C.A. § 6-16-1201 et seq.
  • A.C.A. § 6-18-232
  • DESE Rules Governing Concurrent College and High School Credit for Students Who Have Completed the Eighth Grade

Adopted: 11/8/05
Revised: 11/19/07
Revised: 12/12/17
Last Revised: 6/26/19

5.25 Marketing of Personal Information

The Pulaski County Special School District shall not collect, disclose, or use personal information for the purpose of marketing or for selling that information or to otherwise provide that information to others for that purpose.

Personal information is defined, for the purposes of this policy only, as individually identifiable information including:

  1. a student or parent’s first and last name,
  2. a home or other physical address (including street name and the name of the city or town),
  3. telephone number, and
  4. social security identification number.

The district may collect, disclose, or use personal information that is collected from students for the exclusive purpose of developing, evaluating, or providing educational products or services for, or to, students or educational institutions such as the following:

  1. College or other postsecondary education recruitment, or military recruitment;
  2. Book clubs, magazines, and programs providing access to low cost literary products;
  3. Curriculum and instructional materials used by elementary schools and secondary schools;
  4. Tests and assessments used by elementary schools and secondary schools to provide cognitive, evaluative, diagnostic, clinical, aptitude, or achievement information about students (or to generate other statistically useful data for the purpose of securing such tests and assessments) and the subsequent analysis and public release of the aggregate data from such tests and assessments;
  5. The sale by students of products or services to raise funds for school related or education related activities; and
  6. Student recognition programs.

Legal Reference: 20 USC § 1232h (c)
Adopted: 12/12/17
Last Revised: 8/16/18

5.26 Alternative Learning Environments

The District shall provide an eligible alternative learning environment (ALE) for each eligible ALE student enrolled in a District school. The ALE shall be part of an intervention program designed to provide guidance, counseling, and academic support to students who are experiencing emotional, social, or academic problems. Placement of a student in an ALE shall not be punitive in nature.

The superintendent or designee shall appoint an Alternative Education Placement Team which shall have the responsibility of determining student placement in the ALE. A student may be enrolled in an ALE only on the referral of the Alternative Education Placement Team. The team's placement decision is final and may not be appealed.

The team is to be comprised of the following:

  • a school counselor from the referring school;
  • the ALE administrator and/or ALE teacher;
  • the building principal or assistant principal from the referring school;
  • a parent, legal guardian, person having lawful control of the student, or person standing in loco parentis (if they choose to participate);
    • The District shall document its efforts to contact the student's parent, legal guardian, person having lawful control of the student, or person standing in loco parentis to schedule a meeting or a phone call for a placement meeting at the convenience of the parent, legal guardian, person having lawful control of the student, or person standing in loco parentis, and maintain such documentation in the student’s Student Action Plan (SAP).
  • LEA special education/504 representative (if applicable);
  • at least one (1) of the student's regular classroom teacher(s); and
  • if the District so chooses, the student.

Students who are placed in the ALE shall exhibit at least two (2) of the characteristics from the items listed below:

  1. Disruptive behavior;
  2. Dropping out from school;
  3. Personal or family problems or situations;
  4. Recurring absenteeism;

For the purposes of the ALE, personal or family problems or situations are conditions that negatively affect the student’s academic and social progress. These may include, but are not limited to:

  1. Ongoing, persistent lack of attaining proficiency levels in literacy and mathematics
  2. Abuse: physical, mental, or sexual;
  3. Frequent relocation of residency;
  4. Homelessness;
  5. Inadequate emotional support;
  6. Mental/physical health problems;
  7. Pregnancy; or
  8. Single parenting.

No later than five (5) school days after a student begins alternative education interventions, the Alternative Education Placement Team shall develop a signed agreement between the ALE, the parent, legal guardian, person having lawful control of the student, or person standing in loco parentis (if they choose to participate); and the student, outlining the responsibility of the ALE, parent, legal guardian, person having lawful control of the student, or person standing in loco parentis; and the student to provide assurance that the plan for each student is successful.

No later than one (1) week after a student begins alternative education interventions, the Alternative Education Placement Team shall assess the student’s current functioning abilities and all relevant social, emotional, academic, career, and behavioral information and develop an SAP outlining the intervention services to be provided to the student that is in compliance with the Division of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) Rules. The SAP may be revised from time to time by the ALE placement team and a positive behavior or transitional plan shall be developed and added to the SAP prior to a student’s return to the regular educational environment.

The district’s ALE program shall follow class size, staffing, curriculum, and expenditure requirements identified in the ADE Rules.

Legal References:

  • A.C.A. § 6-20-2305(b)(2)
  • A.C.A. § 6-48-101 et seq.
  • DESE Rules Governing the Distribution of Student Special Needs Funding and the Determination of Allowable Expenditure of These Funds – 3.01, 4.00, and 8.0

Adopted: 11/29/11
Revised: 12/12/17
Last Revised: 6/26/19

5.29 Wellness Policy

I. Purpose: To establish regulations for implementation of the District’s wellness policy.

II. Personnel affected: building level administrators, food service managers, and classroom teachers.

The Pulaski County Special School District recognizes that the health and physical well-being of students directly affects their ability to learn. Childhood obesity increases the incidence of adult diseases occurring in children and adolescents such as heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes. The increased risk carries forward into their adulthood. Research indicates that a healthy diet and regular physical activity can help prevent obesity and the diseases resulting from it. It is understood that the eating habits and exercise patterns of students cannot be magically changed overnight, but at the same time, the Board of Directors believes it is necessary to strive to create a culture in our schools that consistently promotes good nutrition and physical activity.

The problem of obesity and inactivity is a public health issue. The Board of Directors is keenly aware that it has taken years for this problem to reach its present level and will similarly take years to correct. The responsibility for addressing the problem lies not only with the schools and the Division of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE), but with the community and its residents, organizations and agencies. Therefore, the District shall enlist the support of the larger community to find solutions that improve the health and physical activity of our students.

Wellness Committee

To enhance the district’s efforts to improve the health of our students, a School Nutrition and Physical Activity Advisory Committee (SNPAAC) shall be formed. It shall be structured in a way to ensure age-appropriate recommendations are made that correlate to the District’s grade configurations. The SNPAAC shall have the powers and responsibilities delegated to it by statute and Rule and are incorporated into this policy by reference. The overarching goal of the committee shall be to promote student wellness by monitoring how well the District is doing at implementing this policy. The SNPAAC shall use modules 1, 2, 3, 4, 10, and 11 of the Centers for Disease Control’ (CDC) School Health Index as a basis for annually assessing each school’s progress toward meeting the requirements of this policy. The results of the annual assessment shall be included in the school district’s support plan (SDSP), provided to each school’s principal, and reported to the board. Goals and objectives for nutrition and physical activity shall also be included in the SDSP.

The SNPAAC shall be made up of Individuals from the following groups to the extent interested persons from each group desire to be included in the development, implementation, and periodic review of the District's wellness policy:

  • Members of the District’s Board of Directors;
  • School administrators;
  • School nutrition personnel;
  • Teacher organizations;
  • Teachers of physical education;
  • Parents;
  • Students;
  • Professional groups (such as nurses);
  • School health professionals (such as school nurses, school counselors, and social workers); and
  • Community members.

The SNPAAC shall provide written recommendations to the District’s Child Nutrition Director concerning menus and other foods sold in the school cafeteria. Such recommendations shall be based, at least in part, on the information the Committee receives from the District on the requirements and standards of the National School Lunch Program and from menus for the National School Lunch Program and other food sold in the school cafeteria on a quarterly basis.

The SNPAAC will meet at least quarterly. Meeting dates for the SNPAAC will be placed on the District’s calendar.

School Health Coordinator

To assist the SNPAAC in ensuring that the District fulfills the requirements of this policy, a District level School Health Coordinator (Designated District Official) shall be appointed. In addition, a school level School Health Coordinator shall be appointed who shall be responsible for assisting the District level School Health Coordinator in ensuring that each school fulfills the requirements of this policy.

Goals

In its efforts to improve the school nutrition environment, promote student health, and reduce childhood obesity, the District will adhere to the DESE Rules Governing Nutrition and Physical Activity Standards and Body Mass Index for Age Assessment Protocols. To promote nutrition, physical activity, and other school based activities that will improve student wellness, the District, working with the SNPAAC, has established the following goals:

  1. Implement a grade appropriate nutrition education program that will develop an awareness of and appreciation for nutrition and physical activity throughout the curriculum;
  2. Enforce existing physical education requirements and engage students in healthy levels of vigorous physical activity;
  3. Strive to improve the quality of physical education curricula and increase the training of physical education teachers;
  4. Follow the Arkansas Physical Education and Health Education Frameworks in grades K-12;
  5. Not use food or beverages as rewards for academic, classroom, or sports performances;
  6. Establish class schedules and bus routes that do not directly or indirectly restrict meal access;
  7. Provide students with ample time to eat their meals in pleasant cafeteria and dining areas;
  8. Abide by the current allowable food and beverage portion standards;
  9. Meet or exceed the more stringent of Arkansas’ or the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Nutrition Standards for reimbursable meals and a la’ carte foods served in the cafeteria;
  10. Restrict access to competitive foods as required by law and Rule;
  11. Conform new and/or renewed vending contracts to the content restrictions contained in the Rules and reduce district dependence on profits from the sale of competitive foods.
  12. Provide professional development to all district staff on the topics of nutrition and/or physical activity;
  13. Utilize the School Health Index available from the CDC to assess how well the district is doing at implementing this wellness policy and at promoting a healthy environment for its students.

Food and Beverages Outside of the District’s Food Service Programs

The District will insure that drinking water is available without charge to all students throughout the school including, but not limited to, in the District’s food service areas.

All food and beverages sold to students on school campus during the school day by school administrators or school non-licensed or licensed staff (principals, coaches, teachers, club sponsors, etc.); students or student groups; parents or parent groups; or another person, company, or organization associated with the school shall meet the Federal Smart Snacks requirements and Arkansas Nutrition Standards at a minimum. These restrictions include, but are not limited to, food and beverages sold in vending venues (machines, ice chests, cabinets) in school stores or as part of school fundraisers.

All food and beverages provided, but not sold, to students on the school campus during the school day by school administrators or school non-licensed or licensed staff (principals, coaches, teachers, club sponsors, etc.); students or student groups; parents or parent groups; or another person, company, or organization associated with the school shall meet the Federal Smart Snacks requirements and Arkansas Nutrition Standards at a minimum. These restrictions include, but are not limited to, food and beverages provided in vending venues (machines, ice chests, cabinets) in school stores or as part of school fundraisers.

Up to a maximum of nine (9) times per school year, school administration may schedule school wide events where food and beverages provided to students are not required to meet the Federal Smart Snacks standards during the scheduled time. The schedule of the events shall be by school, approved by the principal, and shall be part of the annual school calendar.

Food and beverages outside of the District’s food service programs may not be sold, served, or provided to students in the District’s food service areas during meal times.

Elementary students shall not have in-school access to vending machines.

The District does not place nutrition restrictions on food or beverages brought from home that are intended for personal consumption only.

Advertising

In accordance with the USDA regulations, oral, written, or graphic statements made for the purpose of promoting the sale of a food or beverage product that are made by the producer, manufacturer, seller, or any other entity with a commercial interest in the product shall only be permitted on school campus during the school day if they meet or exceed the Federal Smart Snacks standards. This restriction does not apply to:

  • Materials used for educational purposes in the classroom, including, but not limited to:
    • The use of advertisements as a media education tool; or
    • Designing and implementing the health or nutrition curriculum;
  • Clothing, apparel, or other personal items used by students and staff;
  • The packaging of products brought from home for personal consumption; and
  • Currently existing advertisements on school property, including but not limited to, the exterior of vending machines, posters, menu boards, coolers, trash cans, cups used for beverage dispensing , and other food service equipment; however, all future contracts and replacement items shall meet the Federal Smart Snacks standards.

Community Engagement

The District will work with the SNPAAC to:

  1. Encourage participation in extracurricular programs that support physical activity, such as walk-to-school programs, biking clubs, after-school walking etc.;
  2. Encourage the implementation of developmentally appropriate physical activity in after-school childcare programs for participating children;
  3. Promote the reduction of time youth spend engaged in sedentary activities such as watching television and playing video games; and
  4. Encourage the development of and participation in family-oriented community-based physical activity programs.

The District will annually inform the public:

  • Of the web address where the policy is located;
  • Of any changes made to this policy since the previous year;
  • Of the health and wellness priority goals in the District’s SDSP;
  • That a printed copy of the policy may be picked up at the District’s central office; and
  • The amounts and specific sources of funds received and expenditures made from competitive food and beverage contracts.

Assessment of District’s Wellness Policy

At least once every three years, with input from the SNPACC, the District shall assess both the District as a whole and individual schools' status in regards to the implementation and compliance of the goals of this policy, including the health and wellness goals in the District’s SDSP. The assessment shall be based, at least in part, on:

  • The extent to which District schools are in compliance with this policy;
  • The extent to which this policy compares to other model-local school wellness policies;
  • The annual reviews of this policy based on modules 1, 2, 3, 4, 10, and 11 of the CDC’s School Health Index; and
  • A description of the progress made in attaining the goals of this policy.

On the years the assessment occurs, the assessment results shall be reported to the public, including parents, students, and other members of the community as part of the District’s annual report to the public.

The District will update the wellness policy based on the results from the three (3) year assessment.

District Website

  • The District will place on its website:
  • The name, District phone number, and District email address for the District Level School Health Coordinator;
  • The names, district phone numbers, and district email addresses for the School Level School Health Coordinators;
  • The names of the members of the SNPAAC;
  • Meeting dates for the SNPAAC;
  • Information on how community members may get involved with the SNPAAC;
  • A copy of this policy;
  • A copy of the annual review of this policy based on modules 1, 2, 3, 4, 10, and 11 of the CDC’s School Health Index; and
  • A copy of the most recent three (3) year assessment of this policy.

Legal References:

  • Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act 42 U.S.C. § 1751 et seq. as amended by PL 111-296 (Section 204) of 2010. (Section 204 is codified at 42 U.S.C. § 1758(b))
  • Child Nutrition Act of 1966 42 U.S.C. § 1771 et seq.
  • 7 C.F.R. § 210.18
  • 7 C.F.R. § 210.31
  • A.C.A. § 6-20-709
  • A.C.A. §§ 20-7-133, 134, and 135
  • DESE Rules Governing Nutrition and Physical Activity Standards And Body Mass Index For Age Assessment Protocols
  • Allowable Competitive Foods/Beverages - Maximum Portion Size List for Middle, Junior High, and High School
  • Commissioner’s Memo CNU-17-010
  • Commissioner’s Memo CNU-17-013
  • Commissioner’s Memo CNU-17-016
  • Nutrition Standards for Arkansas Public Schools

Adopted: 3/11/08
Revised: 8/8/17
Last Revised: 6/26/19

5.41P Academic Freedom

The Board recognizes the relationships among all parties engaged in the operation of the schools in the District. The philosophy and policies of the District are founded upon the laws and constitutions of Arkansas and the United States. This Republic has endured more than two hundred years to a large extent because of its free and enlightened citizenry. We recognize that the schools are an important part of the whole that runs this nation. We are determined to make our District the strongest element possible. Our society, and indeed the nation, is formed by the molding of all the parts into the whole. Unless all segments pull together, we cannot achieve our best. Academic responsibility is the most vital part of any school system. We believe those people entrusted with instruction in our District should understand that it is their duty to impart knowledge in a manner which encourages learning and develops the total character of the student. We do not believe the government has the right to censure and control academic responsibilities as is done in totalitarian countries. A government which limits and controls the mind of people destroys individuality and freedom. Neither do we believe that individuals or special interest groups have the right to arbitrarily suppress ideas. When individual freedom is destroyed, a nation cannot long survive. The Board is aware that the schools belong to the people who created them by taxation and consent, and accepts its responsibility to the patrons of the District through formation of general policies. As a part of our responsibility, we delegate to the administrators, faculty and staff the authority to implement all policies, including policies concerning academic matters. It is impossible to enumerate the separate and detailed roles and responsibilities of each individual charged with carrying out the various duties of the District. In recognition of these limitations, we hereby adopt the following:

  1. The constitutional and statutory rights of parents, personnel or students of Pulaski County Special School District will not be restricted.
  2. Personnel and students of the District have the right to express opinions and engage in matters of public interest.
  3. Personnel and students of the District will be encouraged to discharge their duties and responsibilities as citizens of the state and nation.
  4. Patrons, students and personnel will follow prescribed procedures in bringing matters to the attention of the Board.
  5. Students will be instructed in accordance with objective standards in all subjects including economics, political, scientific and social issues as well as standard academic subjects.
  6. Teaching personnel will be responsible for the proper use of approved materials in instructing their classes.
  7. Personnel will strive to present a true and complete presentation of subjects and issues.
  8. Students have the right to individual freedom of expression in matters relating to material presented. Such right does not extend to matters intended to disrupt or thwart the rights of others.
  9. Course materials and topics presented to students will generally be those contained in and associated with the material approved in accordance with the policies of the Board. When a teacher expresses a personal view on any subject in a formal classroom setting, it will be identified as a personal view.
  10. A patron(s) or group(s) desiring to present materials or opinions to students on campus will follow policy and apply through channels for approval.
  11. Personnel engaged in the education of students will not be subjected to unreasonable or arbitrary restrictions,
  12. Personnel, patrons and students will have the right to investigate and pursue the implementation of programs and ideas.
  13. Patrons, students and personnel will be encouraged to promote inquiry and an open-ended search for the truth.
  14. The Board acknowledges and supports the constitutional doctrine of separation of church and state.

Cross References: 6.7 Complaints, Handbook for Student Conduct and Discipline (Secondary), Handbook for Student Conduct and Discipline (Elementary)
Adopted: 10/13/81
Revised: 12/12/17
Manual Adoption: 2/8/00

5.42P Multicultural Education

The Board recognizes that the society of the United States is representative of varied ethnic backgrounds, countries, heritages, cultures, races, creeds, colors and languages. The Board also recognizes the importance and the contributions each population has made to the society of the United States. To insure that each student develops a broader knowledge, understanding and appreciation of cultural diversity, the Board makes a commitment to the concept of multicultural education. Multicultural education is an interdisciplinary educational process which includes curriculum development, curriculum review, development, direct classroom use, parent/community involvement and education, and teacher training. Multicultural education is not to be regarded as a separate area to be added to the curriculum. Rather, it is a process and perspective which will be integrated and infused throughout all subject areas at the K-12 grade levels in the total school environment. This process will include the adoption and revision of student learning objectives/outcomes. The total school environment will include but is not limited to the following areas:

  1. Teaching styles and strategies
  2. Student learning styles
  3. Staff-student-parent relationships
  4. Testing, evaluation and assessment
  5. Instructional materials
  6. Formalized curriculum and hidden curriculum
  7. Counseling program
  8. Parent/community input and involvement
  9. Staff behavior
  10. School life and culture
  11. Languages and dialects of the school

Adopted: 11/8/88
Manual Adoption: 2/8/00

5.43P Citizenship / Values Education

I. Purpose: To provide and establish procedures to guide school officials and to protect students in the exercise of their First Amendment rights

II. Personnel affected: Building level administrators and classroom teachers

The Board recognizes the commitment to the ideals and principles of our democratic society and encourages the development of high qualities of citizenship. To encourage loyalty to the United States and emphasize the responsibilities of citizenship, the following citizenship education activities will be made available to District students at the appropriate grade level on a regular basis:

  1. Learning and reciting the Pledge of Allegiance
  2. Learning and singing the National Anthem
  3. Listening to or reading stories about famous Americans and/or famous historical facts and events which foster respect for and understanding of the multicultural, multi-ethnic society which is part of our heritage
  4. Participating in student government activities
  5. Participating in a wide variety of local, state, and national government classroom simulations that include, but are not limited to, mock elections, mock trials and/or mock legislature
  6. Participating in patriotic exercises and observances in the classroom and/or in conjunction with school programs and events as deemed appropriate for the occasion
  7. Participating in any other activities that will lead to making students aware of their increasing responsibilities as citizens of our democratic society with respect for the laws of the land and the rights, opinions, beliefs and personal worth of their fellow men in a multicultural, multi-ethnic society

Guidelines

  1. Students have the right to participate in or abstain from such exercises as the flag salute, oaths or pledges, anthems, and religious observances. Students who refrain from such exercises may remain seated or stand outside the classroom. Students have the responsibility to respect the choice of those who choose to participate or abstain from such exercises. Teachers, parents and students have the responsibility to express to principals, for appropriate action, their religious or ethical objections to participating in selected features or class activities.
  2. The Pledge of Allegiance and/or National Anthem will be broadcast over the school intercom at the beginning of the school day. Administrators or office personnel will be designated to broadcast the pledge and/or anthem.
  3. Teachers have the right to participate in or abstain from such exercises as the flag salute, oaths or pledges, anthems and religious observances. Should a teacher not want to participate, he may remain seated or remove himself from the classroom. If a teacher chooses to leave the classroom, the principal will provide supervision for the students during the pledge and/or anthem.

Adopted: 4/12/88
Revised: 12/12/17
Date issued: 5/10/88 Issuing office: Division of Learning Services
Manual Adoption: 2/8/00

5.44P Achievement Gap Task Force

The purpose of the task force is to advise and work with its local board of directors and administration on closing the gap in academic achievement and on developing a collaborative plan for achieving that goal.

  1. Each task force shall report to its local board of directors;
  2. Each task force shall include key stakeholders in the community who are committed to improving the education of all children, especially those who are underachieving, and who agree to attend task force meetings on a regular basis, take an active role in discussions and activities, listen to the ideas, suggestions, and comments of other task force members as well as community members, inform other members of the school and community of the work of the task force, participate in any training for the task force members such as consensus building, problem-solving, and group dynamics, and seek actively data-driven solutions to improving the achievement of all students; and
  3. Task force members shall be representative of community demographics, race, ethnic, gender, and socioeconomic diversity. It is recommended, but not required, that they include:
    1. Three (3) parents to include one (1) parent who has a child at an elementary school, one (1) who has a child at a junior high or middle school, and one (1) who has a child at a high school selected by the Superintendent or his/her designee.
    2. School administrators, teachers, instructional support personnel, exceptional children personnel, and second language specialists, each of whom shall be selected by the superintendent or his/her designee;
    3. One (1) member of the local board of education;
    4. One (1) representative of the local department of social services;
    5. At least one (1) juvenile court counselor;
    6. At least one (1) representative of local law enforcement;
    7. Representatives from community-based organizations, as selected by the superintendent or his/her designee upon recommendation from those organizations;
    8. Two (2) high school students, as recommended by their student councils and appointed by the superintendent or his/her designee; and
    9. Any other community representatives, parents, or patrons, as selected by the superintendent or his/her designee.
    10. Each task force shall:
      1. Decide on training that it may need;
      2. Determine what information and data the task force will need, plan and schedule presentations on the information and data which shall be disaggregated by race, ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic status. Examples may include state test data, discipline statistics, teacher-student ratio, student and teacher attendance data, faculty composition by race, gender, ethnicity, and professional preparation of educators;
      3. Define the communication process and person responsible for disseminating information to the public. Communication shall include the posting of information on a website and shall provide appropriate translations, as needed;
        1. Set aside specific meetings to analyze and synthesize data and information.
        2. The task force shall use the data to identify and prioritize the problems with student achievement;
      4. Identify and review current effective programs and instructional strategies that address student achievement needs, identify criteria used to determine their effectiveness, determine changes to improve the effectiveness, identify gaps in services, and identify needed information to determine research-based programs and strategies that are effective in addressing the gaps; and
      5. Prepare a report for the school and community that includes an implementation plan, benchmarks, and the monitoring process.

Adoption: 11/19/07
Revised: 12/12/17
History. Acts 2003, No. 1777, § 3.
Legal Reference: Arkansas School of Laws 6-15-1603
Manual Adoption: 2/8/00

5.45P Homebound Instruction

Homebound instruction can be provided to a student who is physically or emotionally unable to attend school due to a health condition, injury, and/or physical or mental impairment which, in the professional opinion of a licensed medical examiner or psychiatrist will cause the student to be absent from school for four (4) or more consecutive weeks. The amount of instructional services provided through homebound instruction will be four (4) to six (6) hours per week or a period of time to be determined by school personnel in relation to each student’s educational needs and/or their physical and mental health.

Cross References.: Handbooks for Student Conduct and Discipline (Secondary), Handbooks for Student Conduct and Discipline (Elementary)
Adopted: 12/8/86
Revised: 12/12/17
Manual Adoption: 2/8/00

5.46P Adult Education Program Administration

The Board authorizes the District to participate in the Adult Basic Education (ABE) Program and the General Adult Education (GED) Program as administered and funded by the Division of Workforce Education Department of Career Education of the Arkansas Department of Education. ABE and GED programs at the District level will be administered through the Division of Learning Services and responsibility for financial functions will be in the office of Business Affairs. The Board is committed to programs for out of school youth and adult unless participation incurs excessive financial obligations from public school funds or handicaps the District’s regular school program as far as facilities are concerned.

Legal Reference: School Laws of Arkansas 6-16-309
Adopted: 10/10/72
Revised: 01/11/83
Last Revised: 12/12/17
Manual Adoption: 2/8/00